Bird Families

Quotings and Manakins

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  • Area
  • Andes from northern Venezuela to northern Bolivia
  • Habitat: Forests along mountain rivers and gorges (at an altitude of 500-2400 m)
  • Size: 38cm

Males sport bright orange or scarlet feathers and a tall crest that hangs over a golden yellow beak. Females are brownish brown. Rock bettas usually live in the lower tiers of tropical forests. Possessing a fast maneuverable flight, they deftly maneuver among the dense branches of trees and bushes in search of fruit. Females also hunt frogs and lizards with which to feed the chicks.

During the mating season, they flock at the morning and evening dawn to the current - a place where they perform complex dances, demonstrate threats to rivals and loudly call out to females. Only the strongest and bravest male gets the right to mate. A fertilized female builds a bulky clay nest on a rocky ledge, in the form of a truncated cone with a fossa at the top about 6.5 cm deep. Sometimes several females build nests next to each other. There are 2 eggs in a clutch.

Striped manakin fruit beetle - "Pipreola arcuata"

  • Area
  • Andes (from northwest Venezuela to the center of Eastern Bolivia)
  • Habitat: Foggy mountain forests at an altitude of 1200-3350 m
  • Size: 21cm

This heavily built fruit lover lives in the misty mountain forests at the highest altitude of any other cotting. The male has bright yellow-green-black plumage, the female is greenish-olive.

The beak of birds of both sexes is orange-red. They inhabit the lower and middle tiers of the forest, feed mainly on fruits and insects. There is no information on the reproduction of the species.

Black-winged bell ringer - "Procnias averano"

  • Area
  • Separate regions of Colombia, Guyana, Venezuela, Northern Brazil, about. Trinidad
  • Habitat: Forests up to 1600 m
  • Size: 25cm

Because of the thick fringe of black earrings hanging from the throat, this bird is sometimes also called the bearded bell ringer. Both males and females have beards. These shy, cautious birds live in pairs or singly. They feed on large fruits: they pluck them from trees on the fly, and eat them sitting on a branch.

During mating season, the male arranges bizarre demonstrations in front of females and rival males. Sitting on his favorite branch in the lower tier of the forest, he begins to jump into the air to a height of 1.2 m and descend with his tail spread out on the adjacent branches. After mating, the female builds a light cup-shaped nest with thin walls from the twigs of certain tree species. It is located at a height of 2.5-15 m in the horizontal fork of the branch closer to the outer side of the crown of the tree. The female incubates a single egg for about 23 days.

Collar Cotinga - "Spangled Cotinga"

  • Area
  • Eastern Andes from Colombia and Guyana to the Brazilian Amazon and Bolivia
  • Habitat: Forests, woodlands, savannah
  • Size: 21cm

The strikingly beautiful bright blue plumage of the male plays in the sun with an azure metallic sheen. These are flocking birds. When feeding on forest trees, they tend to cluster into large groups, which may include other species of birds. The nest is a shallow, loose structure of twigs and roots; outside it is covered with whitish filaments (hyphae) of the mycelium. It is built by a female.

Alone, she incubates a clutch of 1, less often 2 eggs.

Amazonian umbrella bird - "Cephalopterus ornatus"

  • Area
  • North of South America (up to Brazilian Amazon and North Bolivia)
  • Habitat: Virgin forests up to 1400 m
  • Sizes: 40-48 cm

This largest of the cotting differs from its congeners in entirely black plumage, a tall crest of long silky feathers hanging over its beak and a long feathered outgrowth hanging from the throat. The female has much less crest and tie than the male. These bizarre short-winged birds live in the upper tier of the tropical forest, where they scurry with loud cries in the crowns of trees in search of fruits and insects.

Each male has a favorite tree, sitting on which he unfolds the crest, hangs down his tie and, filling two special extensions of the trachea with air, begins to emit loud buzzing sounds. The nest in the form of a shallow platform of branches is located at the fork in the branches of a low tree. The only egg is incubated exclusively by the female.

Subfamily Manakina (Piprinae)

Includes 52 species of small, brightly colored birds with bizarre mating behavior, living in the tropical forests of Central and South America. The body length in most species is 12.5-15 cm. Males and females differ sharply in color.

The plumage of males is usually dominated by black color, sharply contrasting with bright color markings on certain parts of the body. Females are olive green. The bright coloration helps males attract females during the mating season.

Blue-spine red-footed manakin - "Chiroxiphia pareola"

  • Area
  • North of South America to southeast Brazil and northern Bolivia, Tobago
  • Habitat: Rainforests, overgrown forest clearings
  • Size: 10cm

Pairs or small flocks of these birdies can most often be found among low thickets of bushes along the banks of rivers and swamps. Males differ from females in blue coloration of the back and red crown.

Males arrange mating demonstrations on special branches, previously cleaned of leaves and bark. They begin with the fact that the dominant male calls out to his “friend”, the subordinate male, with loud cries. Then both birds begin to scream in a duet, and the subordinate male makes sounds a fraction of a second later than the dominant one.

When the female appears, the males begin to dance, but as soon as the dominant expresses a desire to mate with her, the subordinate flies away, leaving the spouses alone. Before mating, the dominant male gives the female a solo show. The walls of the nest, made of the finest plant fibers and cobwebs, are so transparent that the eggs or chicks inside are visible through them. There are 2 eggs in a clutch.

Thread-tailed piper - "Pipra filicauda"

  • Area
  • Eastern Andes from Venezuela and Colombia to northeastern Peru and western Brazil
  • Habitat: Rainforests, cultural plantings
  • Size: 11.5cm

In males and females of this manakin, the tips of the tail feathers are devoid of fans and are represented by thin bare rods. Thread-tailed pipers prefer to settle in damp forests, forest clearings and cocoa plantations. They lead a solitary lifestyle and keep in the upper tiers of forests. Their food is fruits and insects.

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